Survival – Bath Salts Lead to ‘Zombie’ Attacks

If you haven’t heard this story, folks, this is a humdinger.  The story below is from the AP.  Read it.  This isn’t the only time this drug has caused someone to do crazy violenct things in the Miami area recently.  Make sure you read the parts below the story for more details and how to respond to this type of situation.  This story appears on my Prepper Outdoors site, as well, but I felt it was important enough to get it to both my audiences.

 Associated Press

MIAMI –  It is being called one of this city’s goriest crimes: A naked man was on top of another nude man along a busy highway, biting into the man’s face, tearing it to pieces. A police officer arrived to help, but the mauler growled at him and continued to chew away, stopping only when he was shot to death.

Miami police said little Tuesday about the attack, which took place Saturday afternoon in the shadow of The Miami Herald headquarters. Surveillance video from the newspaper’s security camera showed cars, motorcycles, pedestrians and bicyclists passing by.

The victim, identified as 65-year-old Ronald Poppo, a homeless man who lived under the causeway, was in critical condition.

“He had his face eaten down to his goatee. The forehead was just bone. No nose, no mouth,” said Sgt. Armando Aguilar, president of the Miami Fraternal Order of Police. “In my opinion, he just happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time.”

Sgt. Javier Ortiz, vice president of the Miami Fraternal Order of Police, said it was one of the bloodiest “and goriest scenes I’ve ever been to.”

“It was not only grotesque, it was just very sad, the amount of blood. It was very sad to see what happened to this gentleman that had his face eaten,” Ortiz said.

It’s not clear what led Rudy Eugene, 31, to attack Poppo. Eugene’s ex-wife, Jenny Ductant, told WPLG-TV, said he was somewhat paranoid.

“I wouldn’t say he had mental problem but he always felt like people was against him … No one was for him, everyone was against him,” she told the station. She and Eugene’s mother declined comment when reached by The Associated Press.

Larry Vega was riding his bicycle off the causeway, which connects downtown Miami with Miami Beach, when he saw the attack.

“The guy was, like, tearing him to pieces with his mouth, so I told him, `Get off!”‘ Vega told Miami television station WSVN (http://bit.ly/L6kwWt). “The guy just kept eating the other guy away, like, ripping his skin.”

Vega flagged down the Miami police officer, who can be seen exiting his car on the Herald video. Vega said the officer repeatedly ordered the attacker to get off. Eugene just picked his head up and growled at the officer before continuing to maul his victim, Vega said.

The officer shot Eugene, but he just kept chewing, Vega said. The officer fired again, killing Eugene.

Vega refused to comment when reached by The Associated Press, saying he wanted to put what he witnessed behind him.

Detective William Moreno would not release details about the shooting, citing the ongoing investigation. The Miami-Dade County medical examiner declined to provide any information until after the autopsy, which was scheduled for Tuesday. Police have not released details from the autopsy and it could be weeks before the results of toxicology tests are available.

Ortiz said the officer, who is part of a crisis intervention team and trained to deal with the mentally ill, had no choice but to fire.

“He’s clearly shaken up,” Ortiz said, adding that the officer had been administratively reassigned pending an investigation, as is standard after an officer-involved shooting.

After the shooting, the Herald’s video zooms in on the scene. Most of it is blocked by an overpass, but two sets of uncovered legs can be seen. One set never moves, while the other twists and turns as if the person is in pain.

“It was just a blob of blood,” Vega said. “You couldn’t really see, it was just blood all over the place.”

Court records show that Poppo has several arrests for public intoxication.

According to Miami-Dade court records, Eugene had been arrested for multiple misdemeanors, mostly marijuana-related charges. The most recent arrest was in 2009. The Herald reported that he played football at a Miami area high school in the late 1990s.

Ives Eugene, who identified himself as Rudy Eugene’s uncle, described his nephew as a “nice and hard-working” man who washed cars at a local dealership.

He said his nephew had asked his girlfriend to borrow her car, but she said no. “So he rode the bicycle, and he never came back home,” he said.

What this story means!

“Bath Salts” as the drug is called is a danger to everyone right now.  You’ve heard the CDC talk about zombies.  Obviously they were using that as a way to get people to read their article, but they may have been closer to the truth than they thought.  The drug makes people act out violent zombie-like acts on other people.  You cannot talk them down and you, likely, can’t physically take them on either. So how do you handle such an ordeal?

Hopefully you’re carrying some sort of defensive weapon.  If you have a firearm, the best you can do once you’re in danger is fire.  Go for center mass.  Even though they’re all hopped up on this horrible drug, they’re still a person and are suseptible to effects of a bullet.  If you can call the police, rather than getting involved, do so.  That’s what they’re paid to do.  Do not get involved unless your life ot that of another person is in danger.

If you have a knife and are attacked by one of these people, there are three really good strike points that will end the fight almost immediately.  The first is to bury that knife in the side of the assailant’s head; game over.  The second is to slash the throat and the third is to make repeated stabs into the chest, hitting the heart and lungs.  The second and third option will allow the attacker to continue the fight for several seconds, but that’s about it.  Either way, the fight will be over quickly. 

Be prepared to defend yourself, folks.  With the drugs out there that make people do this kind of thing, the need to be alert is even more important.

See below from WebMD…

 

“Ivory Wave,” “Purple Wave,” Vanilla Sky,” and “Bliss” — all are among the many street names of a so-called designer drug known as “bath salts,” which has sparked thousands of calls to poison centers across the U.S. over the last year. 

Citing an “imminent threat to public safety,” the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) made illegal the possession and sale of three of the chemicals commonly used to make bath salts — the synthetic stimulants mephedrone, MDPV, and methylone. The ban, issued in October 2011, is effective for at least a year. During that time, the agency will decide whether a permanent ban is warranted.

WebMD talked about bath salts and other designer drugs with Zane Horowitz, MD, an emergency room physician and medical director of the Oregon Poison Center.

 First of all, what are bath salts?

“The presumption is that most bath salts are MDPV, or methylenedioxypyrovalerone, although newer pyrovalerone derivatives are being made by illegal street chemists. Nobody really knows, because there is no way to test for these substances,” Horowitz says.

Why are they called bath salts?

“It’s confusing. Is this what we put in our bathtubs, like Epsom salts? No. But by marketing them as bath salts and labeling them ‘not for human consumption,’ they have been able to avoid them being specifically enumerated as illegal,” Horowitz says.

What do you experience when you take bath salts?

“Agitation, paranoia, hallucinations, chest pain, suicidality. It’s a very scary stimulant that is out there. We get high blood pressure and increased pulse, but there’s something more, something different that’s causing these other extreme effects. But right now, there’s no test to pick up this drug. The only way we know if someone has taken them is if they tell you they have.

The clinical presentation is similar to mephedrone [a chemical found in other designer drugs], with agitation, psychosis, and stimulatory effects. Both of these agents should be of concern, as severe agitated behavior, like an amphetamine overdose, has occurred.

A second concern is the ongoing suicidality in these patients, even after the stimulatory effects of the drugs have worn off. At least for MDPV, there have been a few highly publicized suicides a few days after their use,” Horowitz says.

Are bath salts illegal?

“You can find them in mini-marts and smoke shops sold as Ivory Wave, Bolivian Bath, and other names,” Horowitz says. “The people who make these things have skirted the laws that make these types of things illegal. While several states have banned the sale of bath salts, ultimately it will have to be a federal law that labels these as a schedule 1 drug, which means it has no medicinal value but a high potential for abuse, and declare them illegal.”

Are bath salts addictive? How are they taken?

“We don’t know if they are addictive. We have not had enough long-term experience with it. Acute toxicity is the main problem. But many stimulants do cause a craving. The people who take them are very creative. They snort it, shoot it, mix it with food and drink,” Horowitz says.

In October 2011, the DEA used its authority to place several of the chemicals used to produce bath salts under their control, and it’s likely that they will permanently illegalize the possession and sale of these chemicals and products that contain them. What impact will that have?

“Pretty much all of these chemicals will end up permanently banned,” Horowitz says. “But it’s easy to say, ‘We’ve banned them.’ It’s something else to police them and make them go away. Cocaine, heroin, [and] marijuana are illegal, but they are all still out there. Designer drugs like bath salts never really go away. How people make them and how they sell them are the only things that change. People will abuse them until there’s a crisis that brings attention to them, then they will disappear and a new drug will come along to fill the void.”

Bath salts are the latest example of designer drugs. Where do you see this trend going?

“That’s right. They are part of a long line of other pills and substances that we call designer drugs. And drug makers will keep creating new combinations at home and in illicit labs,” Horowitz says. “It’s almost impossible to keep up. And the motivation for buying them is always the same: Drugs like these are new and below the radar, unlike named illegal drugs.”

It’s not illegal?????  WTF???? 

This isn’t weed, people.  This isn’t opium, either.  This is a chemical that makes people crazy.  This is nuts that it isn’t outlawed or at least the producers and users aren’t punished for their blatant disregard for the well-being of others.

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