Posts tagged ‘Nutrition’

2 June, 2012

The Benefits of Beer

I was out in the garage cleaning tonight, having a few beers (Lone Star to be specific) and I had a thought.  I remembered the monks in Germany drinking beer to survive the fasting of Lent.  I remembered thinking, when I first heard about it, that they were drunks looking for an excuse to drink.  After all, they are Germans.  Don’t get offended… I’m part German and I drink a few.  I’m also Irish and Scottish so I’m just screwed.  Anyway, I remembered writing a paper on the German monks while I was in college several years ago and remembered the nutritional value of beer.

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10 April, 2012

Water Retaining Gardening – Hoogaculture

Well, I think that’s how it’s spelled, but either way here’s what it is and how it can help you.

Have you ever had a garden that just kept drying out and dying off?  Not enough water retention in the soil? Try this out:

  • Dig a hole where you plan to garden and dig it pretty deep.  Say 4 to 5 feet deep if you can.
  • Throw logs into the hole, filling it about half way. 
  • Fill the dirt back in and fill the hole

I know this sounds like a crazy thing to do, but follow me here.  When you put your plants in the ground and water them the first time, make sure you give them lots of water.  The water will seep into the ground and permeate the logs.  The logs act as a sponge and will slowly release water back into the soil as the ground dries.

But what happens when the wood breaks down and rots?  Well, for about the first year, the logs will break down, taking a lot of the nitrogen from the soil, so plant things that add nitrogen to the soil like beans.  Stay away from nitrogen hogs like corn.

The next year, the wood will still be there and will still act as a sponge, but it won’t deplete the nitrogen in the soil so you can grow pretty much anything there.

You won’t have to water it as often as the wood keeps a steady flow of water back into the soil until it dries out and you should see deeper root systems and more lush vegetation.

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