Where is the breaking point?

There has been so much going on in terms of federal movement toward a totalitarian government.  U.S. Rep. Jose Serrano, D-N.Y., and a supporter of President Obama, has introduced House Joint Resolution 15 to repeal the 22nd Amendment and thus abolish presidential term limits.  This isn’t the first time he’s done that either.  Then we have Homeland Security issues, drones poised to kill Americans, violations of the vast majority of the Bill of Rights; what has to happen to bring about the breaking point?The next question is what will happen once we reach the breaking point?  Will there be violent revolution or civil war?  What’s the end game?  Well, let’s start with looking at some of the issues.

Google has announced that the FBI has been watching and monitoring American citizens internet searches.  According to Fox News:

The FBI used National Security Letters — a form of surveillance that privacy watchdogs call “frightening and invasive” — to surreptitiously seek information on Google users, the web giant has just revealed.

Google’s disclosure is “an unprecedented win for transparency,” privacy experts said Wednesday. But it’s just one small step forward.

“Serious concerns and questions remain about the use of NSLs,” the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Dan Auerbach and Eva Galperin wrote. For one thing, the agency issued 16,511 National Security Letters in 2011, the last year for which data was available. But Google was gagged from saying just how many letters it received — leaving key questions unanswered.

“The terrorists apparently would win if Google told you the exact number of times the Federal Bureau of Investigation invoked a secret process to extract data about the media giant’s customers,” Wired’s David Kravets wrote. He described the FBI’s use of NSLs as a way of “secretly spying” on Google’s customers.

National Security Letters are a means for the FBI to obtain information on people from telecommunications companies, authorized by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) and expanded under the Patriot Act. It lets the agency seek information on a subscriber to a wire or electronic communications service, although not things like the content of their emails or search queries, Google said.

And thanks to secrecy constraints built into NSLs, companies that receive them usually aren’t even allowed to acknowledge the request for information. Citing such extreme secrecy, privacy experts have decried the use of these letters in the past.

“Of all the dangerous government surveillance powers that were expanded by the USA PATRIOT Act, the National Security Letter (NSL) power … is one of the most frightening and invasive,” the EFF wrote. “These letters … allow the FBI to secretly demand data about ordinary American citizens’ private communications and Internet activity without any meaningful oversight or prior judicial review.”

Thanks to negotiations with the government, Google finally opened the smallest chink in the armor, allowing the search giant to reveal the fact that it had received these requests for data, as well as some general information about them.

“Visit our page on user data requests in the U.S. and you’ll see, in broad strokes, how many NSLs for user data Google receives, as well as the number of accounts in question,” Richard Salgado, Google’s legal director of law enforcement and information security, wrote in a Tuesday blog post.

“People don’t always use our services for good, and it’s important that law enforcement be able to investigate illegal activity,” Salgado wrote.

No other technology company presently disclose such basic information about government requests, experts noted.

So, as if that isn’t scary enough, Eric Holder wouldn’t tell Congress that the White House won’t use drones in the US to kill Americans with, or without, a warrant.  I listened to the hearing and good ol’ Holder was beating around the bush and acting as if he didn’t understand the question.  This guy is as likely to strike against his fellow Americans as Stalin was against the Russians.

On top of that, Homeland Security bought even more rounds of ammo than initially contracted in March 2012.  They have now bought over 1.6 billion rounds.  Based on the monthly amount of ammo used in the War of Terror, Homeland Security now has enough ammunition to wage a full scale war for the next 30 years.  Yeah… you read that right… 30 freakin’ years!

Between DHS’s raids and such and the White House’s current policy, no less than 7 of the original Bill of Rights have been violated.

Amendment I

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

The White House has announced and named several media outlets and persons that it is watching and monitoring.  Seriously?  Yes, seriously.


Amendment II

A well-regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

Well, you’ve seen what’s going on here.


Amendment III

No Soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the Owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law.


Amendment IV

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

Using drones most likely would violate this Amendment.  Requesting information from internet search companies like Google without warrants falls into this category, too.


Amendment V

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.

NDAA, need I say more?


Amendment VI

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the Assistance of Counsel for his defence.

NDAA again.


Amendment VII

In Suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury, shall be otherwise re-examined in any Court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.


Amendment VIII

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.

NDAA… Hmmm… seeing a pattern here yet?


Amendment IX

The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.

This is the feds getting involved in everything from local law enforcement to telling states what they can and cannot do.


Amendment X

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

It seems to me the Department of Justice has become the Department of Injustice.  So, I pose the question once again.  When is the breaking point at which the American people say no more?

III

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